Spine Care

Treatments & Services

Advanced Treatments and Services

At Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital, our Spine Center offers comprehensive diagnosis and treatment options for neck, back, and spinal disorders. In addition to our diagnostic imaging and surgical treatment procedures, we also offer pre-operative educational classes, care management, and social services consultations during your hospitalization, and personalized post-operative comfort management.

Our highly specialized team of neurosurgeons and orthopedic spine surgeons use state-of-the-art surgical interventions and equipment to provide you with the fastest and safest recovery possible.

Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital is the only hospital north of San Francisco that is outfitted with Medtronic’s Stealth-Station navigation and O-arm intra-operative imaging systems, which enable the surgeon to scan a patient’s spine during surgery and perform live, 3-D navigation for placement of spinal hardware.

Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery

Certain spine surgeries performed at Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital’s Spine Center may be done using a minimally invasive approach. Minimally invasive spine surgery provides similar outcomes as traditional spine surgery, but because the incision is smaller, postoperative pain tends to be decreased, and recovery time is usually faster. Your surgeon will talk to you about whether you are a candidate for minimally invasive spine surgery.

The following are some of the surgical procedures in which our surgeons specialize:

Cervical

Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion

Anterior Cervical Discectomy Fusion (ACDF) is a surgical procedure performed on the cervical (neck) region of the spine to relieve pressure on the spinal cord or nerve roots. It involves the removal of a damaged disc (discectomy) through the front (anterior) of the neck. After the disc is removed, an implant filled with bone graft is placed into the empty disc space created by the discectomy. The implant acts to restore disc height and the bone graft serves to promote the fusion process. Fusion is similar to glue that hardens over time to create a solid construct. Because the fusion process takes time, your surgeon will use metal screws and a metal plate to act as an internal splint to stabilize your spine until fusion has occurred.

Anterior Cervical Corpectomy

A corpectomy involves the same surgical approach as the ACDF procedure, except that the entire vertebral body and adjoining discs are removed. For this surgery, your surgeon will use a larger implant to reconstruct the spinal column and maintain alignment.

Cervical Laminectomy

A laminectomy is a surgical procedure to treat cervical spinal stenosis. Your surgeon will remove the portion of the vertebra known as the lamina. The goal of a laminectomy is to relieve any pressure that is being placed on either the spinal cord or the nerve roots. The idea is that when decompression has been achieved, the symptoms of impingement (including neck and arm pain, numbness, tingling, and weakness) will resolve.

Cervical Foraminotomy

A foraminotomy is a surgery that is performed to enlarge the passageway where a spinal nerve root exits the spinal canal. During a foraminotomy, your spine surgeon will remove bone or tissue that obstructs the passageway (known as the foramen) and compresses (pinches) the spinal nerve root, which can cause inflammation and pain.

Cervical Disc Replacement

Rather than fusing and eliminating movement in the joint space of the spine, an artificial disc is placed in the disc space. This preserves range of motion to the cervical spine.

Thoracic

Thoracic Laminectomy

A laminectomy is a surgical procedure to treat spinal stenosis. Your surgeon will remove the portion of the vertebra known as the lamina. The goal of a laminectomy is to relieve any pressure that is being placed on either the spinal cord or the nerve roots.

Lumbar

Lumbar Fusion

Lumbar Fusion surgery is designed to treat pain caused by misalignment or instability of the vertebrae. There are many different approaches to lumbar fusion; your surgeon will decide what the best approach is for you. All lumbar fusions involve the placement of an implant, filled with bone graft, into the disc space. This serves to both restore disc height and to promote the fusion process. Over time, two or more of your vertebrae will fuse together to form one solid bone. The fusion process happens gradually. It is for this reason that your surgeon will use metal rods and screws to act as an internal splint that maintains proper spine alignment. There are five different lumbar fusion techniques currently being performed at Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital.

Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (ALIF)

The anterior (or frontal) approach provides excellent access to the lumbar spine. An incision is made in the lower region of the abdomen and a portion of the disc is removed and replaced with an implant. This approach allows for the placement of a larger implant, which provides a large surface area for the fusion process to occur, and allows for restoration of disc height.

Midline Lumbar Fusion (MIDLF)

This minimally invasive lumbar fusion surgery involves a midline posterior (backside) approach. Because it is considered to be minimally invasive, the length of the incision is shorter than the traditional posterior approach.

Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF)

This approach is an adaptation of the PLIF. TLIF surgery provides direct access to the disc space through the intervertebral foramen, which is the opening between vertebrae through which nerve roots travel.

Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF)

The posterior (backside) approach allows for excellent visualization of the spinal nerve roots.

eXtreme Lateral Interbody Fusion (XLIF)

The lateral (or side) approach allows the surgeon to access the spine while avoiding any major nerves in the area. This also allows for the placement of a larger implant which gives a large surface area for the fusion process to occur and provides for restoration of disc height.

Lumbar Laminectomy

A laminectomy is a surgical procedure to treat lumbar spinal stenosis. Your surgeon will remove the portion of the vertebra known as the lamina. The goal of a laminectomy is to relieve any pressure that is being placed on either the spinal cord or the nerve roots. The idea is that when decompression has been achieved, the symptoms of impingement (including back and leg pain, numbness, tingling, and weakness) will resolve.

Lumbar Discectomy

A discectomy is a surgical procedure to remove a herniated or damaged portion of your disc in your lumbar spine. The purpose of the surgery is to relieve symptoms caused by the pressure that a bulging or herniated disc places on the spinal cord or nerve roots.

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